WHAT I DO.

I'm a writer, curator, editor, artist, publisher, maker, researcher, classicist, poet, copywriter, wannabe dramatist, etc etc etc.

I'm interested in urbanism, food, baroque opera, physics, philosophy, art history, poetry, criticism, languages, neuroscience, 18th-century France, the theatre, Latin literature, fairy tales, architecture and quite a lot more besides.

I am Contributing Editor of Icon Magazine ; Poetry Editor of new online magazine, The Learned Pig ; Co-Editor of Pages Of Magazine , a printed triennial culture + urbanism magazine; and 1/4 of the London-based centre for food research and experimentation, The London Research Kitchen

I have a PhD from King's College London in Latin Literature - specifically the Latin poet, Lucan - and its reception in 18th-century France.

To make sense of what I do, take a look at what I've done.

  • A finished building encloses the imagination within a circle and prevents it from straying beyond its limits. Perhaps the only reason why the sketch for a work gives so much pleasure is that each beholder can finish it as he chooses...
    Eugene Delacroix
  • A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, solve equations, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialisation is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein
  • Rare quiet un-argued, tree unalloyed, perhaps too much. Any rebuke ever parted your chest? If only awe was the wrong word, moved toward what the mulberry now resembles: featherweight walls clambering up a chandelier too rich and moving in too many directions: the mulberry..it would be a city mulberry, a beautiful shape made more beautiful by carrying its requisite number of flying plastic bags. English needs fewer words.
    Jared Stanley
  • Our imagination is stretched to the utmost not, as in fiction, to imagine things which are not really there, but just to comprehend those things which are there.
    Richard Feynman

THE RIGHTNESS OF WAYWARD SENTIMENT.

Intermittent blog posts and other things of interest

biblioteca-leopardi

From Leopardi’s notebooks.

Posted in - Bookshelf
on October 29th, 2013
0 Comments

Although all things great and beautiful and alive have been extinguished from the world, our inclination toward them remains. Though we may be denied these things, nothing has or ever could stop us from wanting …

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alphonse legros

Alphonse Legros.

Posted in - Out and about
on October 24th, 2013
0 Comments

I had a meeting in the V&A the other day, and afterwards I spent an age wandering around the museum looking at beautiful things.

I came across this oil sketch in the sculpture court that I’d …

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  • A finished building encloses the imagination within a circle and prevents it from straying beyond its limits. Perhaps the only reason why the sketch for a work gives so much pleasure is that each beholder can finish it as he chooses...
    Eugene Delacroix
  • A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, solve equations, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialisation is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein
  • Rare quiet un-argued, tree unalloyed, perhaps too much. Any rebuke ever parted your chest? If only awe was the wrong word, moved toward what the mulberry now resembles: featherweight walls clambering up a chandelier too rich and moving in too many directions: the mulberry..it would be a city mulberry, a beautiful shape made more beautiful by carrying its requisite number of flying plastic bags. English needs fewer words.
    Jared Stanley
  • Our imagination is stretched to the utmost not, as in fiction, to imagine things which are not really there, but just to comprehend those things which are there.
    Richard Feynman